Colicky Pain

A 22-year-old male presented with colicky pain on the left side. He was diagnosed with left renal calculi in the past. The following ultrasound images were obtained during the bladder scan. The image on the left was obtained in the supine position and the image on the right was obtained after rolling the patient in the left lateral decubitus position. Images courtesy of UltrasoundCases.info owned by SonoSkills What is the diagnosis? A. Calculus impacted at the right ureterovesical junction B. Bladder wall calcification C. Bladder calculus Test your knowledge of POCUS of Hepatobiliary/Spleen with this knowledge check! Answer: Image on the left shows a single round hyperechoic calculus/stone in the bladder. To confirm if the calculus is not impacted at the ureterovesical junction, roll the patient over to the left or the right lateral decubitus position. If the stone rolls to the dependent position, then it is within the lumen of the urinary bladder. Post void bladder scan revealed no calculus in the bladder. The patient spontaneously passed the small bladder calculus during micturition. References: https://doi.org/10.1002/ccr3.1977

A 22-year-old male presented with colicky pain on the left side. He was diagnosed with left renal calculi in the past. The following ultrasound images were obtained during the bladder scan. The image on the left was obtained in the supine position and the image on the right was obtained after rolling the patient in the left lateral decubitus position.

Images courtesy of UltrasoundCases.info owned by SonoSkills

What is the diagnosis?

A. Calculus impacted at the right ureterovesical junction
B. Bladder wall calcification
C. Bladder calculus

Test your knowledge of POCUS of Hepatobiliary/Spleen with this knowledge check!


Answer:

Image on the left shows a single round hyperechoic calculus/stone in the bladder. To confirm if the calculus is not impacted at the ureterovesical junction, roll the patient over to the left or the right lateral decubitus position. If the stone rolls to the dependent position, then it is within the lumen of the urinary bladder. Post void bladder scan revealed no calculus in the bladder. The patient spontaneously passed the small bladder calculus during micturition.

References:

https://doi.org/10.1002/ccr3.1977

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